Ethics in Sport

Canada is committed to ethics in sport and ensuring Canadian athletes compete on a safe and fair playing field. Canada's domestic anti-doping policies and programs are well respected internationally and the Canadian Anti-Doping Program is fully compliant to the World Anti-Doping Code. Canada continues to exercise leadership in the global anti-doping movement and is host of the World Anti-Doping Agency in Montreal.

The Sport Canada Strategy on Ethical Sport (PDF Version, 305 KB) and the Sport Canada's Anti-Doping Sanctions are in place to enhance ethical conduct in Canadian sport. Together, they address key ethical issues in sport, such as doping, abuse/ harassment, concussions and safety related matters, violence in sport, and other identified ethical issues as they arise. The overall objective is to work collaboratively with our partners, clients, and stakeholders to help protect the integrity of sport.

Anti-Doping

Eliminating doping from sport is a shared effort and requires the commitment, efforts and collaboration of governments, sport organizations, coaches, officials and athletes.

Sport Canada works in collaboration with a number of key partners on anti-doping, including:

  • Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES): The CCES is responsible for the administration of the Canadian Anti-Doping Program and works closely with Sport Canada and national and multisport organizations in Canada to advance a drug free, fair and ethical environment for sport.
  • World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA): Canada assists WADA in its efforts to gain worldwide harmonization of anti-doping policies and programs. Its efforts are aimed at acceptance and implementation of the principles of the World Anti-Doping Program, particularly the World Anti-Doping Code. The Minister of State (Sport) for Canada is one of four representatives of the Americas on the WADA Foundation Board.
  • UNESCO (Convention against Doping in Sport): The purpose of the Convention is to harmonize anti-doping efforts worldwide and to provide an internationally recognized framework for governmental anti-doping measures. Canada played a leadership role in the development of the Convention and was the 2nd country in the world to accept it in . Canada regularly participates in UNESCO meetings which tracks governmental progress related to the Convention.

Sport Canada’s Anti-Doping Sanctions

Authorities

The Government of Canada (Sport Canada) has had a policy against doping in sport in one form or another since October . The current policy is the Canadian Policy Against Doping in Sport (CPADS), which was endorsed by the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers responsible for Sport, Recreation and Fitness in February .

The CPADS is consistent with the Canadian Sport Policy, endorsed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers in , which places particular emphasis on ethics and values in the pursuit of Enhanced Excellence, and Enhanced Capacity goals. Further, the CPADS responds to the responsibility within the Physical Activity and Sport Act, , to ensure that the federal government’s “policy regarding sport is founded on the highest ethical standards and values, including doping-free sport”. (Physical Activity and Sport Act, L.C. , c. C-2, subsection 4 (1))

The CPADS respects the priorities and responsibilities contained within the UNESCO International Convention Against Doping in Sport. Canada signed the Convention in , and it came into full force and effect on . The Government of Canada’s adoption of the UNESCO Convention further signals our respect for the principles of the World Anti-Doping Code, which sets out a harmonized approach to address doping for all sports around the world.

Endorsement of the CPADS and adoption of the Canadian Centre for Ethics and Sports’ (CCES), Canadian Anti-Doping Program (CADP), (as applicable), is a condition of eligibility for funding for all National Sport Organizations and Multisport Service Organizations. Project Stream funding recipients are also responsible for ensuring that they subscribe to the principles and practices of doping-free sport.In addition, athletes must respect and abide by the CPADS and the CCESCADP and any related anti-doping policy of the NSO as a condition of funding under the Athlete Assistance Program.

Context

The motivation for developing, maintaining and updating anti-doping policies has always been based on an unequivocal opposition to the use of banned substances or methods to enhance performance, whose use or practice undermines the integrity of sport and whose use may threaten or risk the health of the individual. The Government of Canada‘s opposition to doping has and continues to be demonstrated by strict financial sanctions designed to act as a deterrent to all individuals in all roles in Canadian sport and to support and respect sport ineligibility sanctions imposed by the authorized sport organizations on individuals who violate anti-doping rules.

It is the belief and position of the Government of Canada that participation in sport at all levels should never be undermined or compromised by the practice of doping. Support from the Government of Canada to enable individuals to be active in sport at all levels and to develop and support high performance excellence is compromised when our true sport values are threatened or undermined.

The negative effects and implications of doping in sport are not limited to the individuals directly involved; the impact is felt across the entire sport community.

The withdrawal of federal financial support through Sport Canada’s funding programs is consistent with the Government of Canada’s, and specifically Sport Canada’s, long-standing position and efforts in anti-doping.

Scope

Building on existing policies, practices, commitments and obligations, this document is designed to clearly articulate the sanctions that will be imposed within the grant and contribution programs administered by the Government of Canada, through Sport Canada, as a result of an anti-doping rule violation.

This administrative action applies automatically to any individual sanctioned with sport ineligibility by any anti-doping organization (which includes NSOs), when such sanctions are imposed in conformity with the World Anti-Doping Code.

Application

Sport ineligibility resulting from anti-doping rule violations attaches to the individual and follows that individual into any subsequent role that he/she might assume in sport, for the duration of the sanction, regardless of retirement or change in role.

Federal funding ineligibility respects this same approach. Specifically, federal funding ineligibility attaches to the individual and follows that individual into any subsequent role that he/she might assume in sport for the duration of the sanction, regardless of retirement or change in role.

Funding Categories

There are two types of federal funding categories available through Sport Canada programs: i) direct; and ii) indirect funding. The category of indirect funding is further subdivided into two areas: a) Salary Support; and b) Sport-Related Benefits. Definitions of these different types of funding are as follows:

  1. Direct funding – Athlete Assistance Program:

    Refers to financial support provided to an individual through the Athlete Assistance Program (carding), in the form of monthly stipends, tuition, deferred tuition, and special needs support.

    1. Indirect Funding – Salary Support:

      Refers to financial support provided to an individual, through a sport organization (National Sport Organization, Multisport Service Organization), or other supported organization, towards any salary, contract for services, employment benefits, fees, honoraria and/or travel or reimbursement for travel or other expenses.

    2. Indirect Funding - Sport-Related Benefits:

      Refers to financial support, through a sport organization, (National Sport Organization, Multisport Service Organization), or other supported organization, which enables an individual to benefit from the provision of other services. This includes but is not limited to: national team support, travel; training camps, facilities and other training; technical support (coaching, physiotherapy etc.); or any other service / benefit including access to Canadian Sport Centre’s and their services, available as a result of Sport Canada funding.

Sport Canada Funding Ineligibility

Funding ineligibility is directly linked to the sport ineligibility sanction received by an individual as a result of an anti-doping rule violation. The funding ineligibility is an administrative sanction that is imposed automatically under one of two categories: i) sport ineligibility of two (2) years or more, or, ii) sport ineligibility of less than two (2) years.

  1. Sport Ineligibility of Two (2) Years or More:

    Any individual who has been sanctioned for an anti-doping rule violation pursuant to or recognized under the CADP or its predecessors resulting in a two-year period of sport ineligibility or greater and, where applicable, has not been reinstated, is permanently ineligible to receive any Direct – Athlete Assistance Program and/or Indirect - Salary Support funding.

    In addition, any individual who has been sanctioned for an anti-doping rule violation pursuant to or recognized under the CADP or its predecessors resulting in a two-year period of sport ineligibility or greater and, where applicable, has not been reinstated, is ineligible to receive any Indirect - Sport-Related Benefits while serving their sport ineligibility sanction.

  2. Sport Ineligibility of Less than Two (2) Years:

    Any individual who has been sanctioned for an anti-doping rule violation pursuant to or recognized under the CADP or its predecessors resulting in a period of sport ineligibility of less than two years is ineligible to receive any Direct – Athlete Assistance Program, Indirect - Salary Support and/or Indirect - Sport-Related Benefits while serving their sport ineligibility sanction.

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