Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for Cultural Property

In this two-day workshop, you will learn how to:

  • Recognize and identify organisms that are detrimental to the longevity of collections.
  • Decide how to respond to the discovery of pests from a suite of options.
  • Assess cultural property for pest risks and propose an IPM plan to mitigate them.

Who should attend?

Staff and volunteers of cultural facilities who are responsible for the physical integrity, research, exhibition and other utility values of collections of cultural property, all of which are harmed by pest activity

Teaching/learning methods

This workshop uses a mix of short talks with illustrative examples to introduce concepts; several participant exercises; and group activities with summary presentations. This course supplements the IPM approach in CCI's Technical Bulletin 29, Combatting Pests of Cultural Property.

Units

The course will be divided into three main units. In each unit you will learn how to:

Identify Pests

  • Identify pests and their capacity to endanger objects and evade control.

Responses to pests

  • Evaluate effective ways to reduce pest numbers through specific control methods available to heritage professionals and the risks these methods may pose to collections.

IPM design

  • Balance the need to mitigate pest harm against the constraints imposed upon proposed solutions by both the object and the institution's resources.

Facilitator

Thomas Strang

Language of Instruction

This workshop can be provided in English

Enrolment Limits

Minimum of 10; maximum of 25

Duration

2 days

Special Requirements

The workshop host institution must be able to provide participants with access to at least one storage area (supervised by staff) and an exhibition gallery where several small groups of participants can work to prepare an IPM assessment.

Management and unregistered staff of the host institution are encouraged to attend the participant's summary presentations and contribute to the discussions about their findings and proposals. One outcome of this workshop has been a renewed approach to IPM in the host institution.

Materials and Equipment

  • A meeting room where people can work in groups of 4 or 5, with board/walls where teaching materials can be posted.
  • One flip chart per group (2 to 6 in total, depending on attendance) with markers and one flip chart or a white board for the instructor.
  • A table for the digital projector (if necessary) and a table for workshop materials and demonstrations.
  • A white wall or screen sufficient for legible PowerPoint presentations (large bed sheets have proved acceptable).

Note: This workshop can also be tailored specifically for your institution and staff if you are planning a systemic institutional IPM program and want initial guidance.

Date modified: